Friday’s Headlines

Cape Flyer service starts for the season, how Seattle beat traffic, and a swan song for MBTA's Orange Line cars.

  • The weekend “CapeFLYER” passenger rail service from South Station to Cape Cod starts service for the season this evening, with a new stop just across the canal in the town of Bourne.
  • On Beacon Hill, the Massachusetts Senate has approved a $42.8 billion spending plan for fiscal year 2020. The budget now goes into a reconciliation process with the slightly smaller House-approved budget (State House News, via the Daily Hampshire Gazette).
  • City Point Capital, a South Boston developer, is being taken to task for building a non-ADA-compliant sidewalk next to a new 5-story condo building, thus blocking pedestrian access to abutting neighbors living in the Boston Housing Authority’s Anne M. Lynch Homes (Boston Herald).
  • Seattle has added 116,000 new residents since 2006, and yet, thanks to robust investment in light rail, bikeways and bus corridors, traffic has declined (Politico).
  • Is biking in the city worth breathing in all the polluted air? Grist’s “Ask Umbra” column says not to worry about it: air pollution is “harder to avoid than you might think,” for one thing – you’re breathing your city’s air even if you stay inside – and besides that, “Even in the most extreme cases — cities in the 99th percentile of particulate matter concentration — an hour-long bike ride is still considered to have net-positive benefits.” (Grist)
  • Finally, the day’s big MBTA news:

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In a sure sign that taking away lanes from cars to create safer, more efficient streets is a politically winning strategy, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh is expected to hold a press conference Tuesday morning to boast about the ambitious changes being made under his administration’s “Healthy Streets” initiative. The Walsh administration is on track to […]